hello!
i'm jenn. i live in chicago with my dog, mavi.
i'm the cards against humanity community manager.
this blog is a little bit of everything. sometimes i post personal writing and photography.


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we were only there a week, but i am really missing london today. this moment in particular. we’d be off the plane just a few hours when we found this spot and marveled at the architecture and laughed about how astonishingly gross the river thames is (we’ve had similar sentiments about the chicago river). bikers and runners were zipping by, but it felt like it was only the two of us, the way it always is when i really boil things down.

we were only there a week, but i am really missing london today. this moment in particular. we’d be off the plane just a few hours when we found this spot and marveled at the architecture and laughed about how astonishingly gross the river thames is (we’ve had similar sentiments about the chicago river). bikers and runners were zipping by, but it felt like it was only the two of us, the way it always is when i really boil things down.

In a study of children aged 2-5, parents interrupted their daughters more than their sons, and fathers were more likely to talk simultaneously with their children than mothers were. Jennifer Coates says: “It seems that fathers try to control conversation more than mothers… and both parents try to control conversation more with daughters than with sons. The implicit message to girls is that they are more interruptible and that their right to speak is less than that of boys.”

Girls and boys’ differing understanding of when to talk, when to be quiet, what is polite and so on, has a visible impact on the dynamics of the classroom. Just as men dominate the floor in business meetings, academic conferences and so on, so little boys dominate in the classroom - and little girls let them.

X  (via albinwonderland)

Working with children for over a decade, this is something I’ve noticed, actually. And for the majority, the little girls in my class and my co-worker’s classes all sit quietly and listen MUCH better than the boys do. Most boys don’t care to be quiet and sit still. And I don’t think this is an attribute of boys being “rowdier” or more “hyper” - believe me, the girls are JUST as off the wall as the boys if you aren’t telling them not to. It must be a learned behavior, and it must be enforced more with the girls so they know they can’t get away with it. You have no idea how many times in my career I’ve heard “boys will be boys,” and smiling parents as they tell me with a laugh, sorry, their son is “wild” and a “handful” as they introduce him to the class.

(via voicelikehelvetica)

And that’s how you do sexism.  That’s how it’s so effectively trained into every single citizen and indoctrinated as normal and right.

(via waltzy)

Mhmm… Other adults used to compliment my parents on how i was such a quiet polite little girl… I had many social difficulties growing up and it was pretty hard for me to live on my own at first, to make friends and to take care of important things that had to do with interacting with strangers. I had to unlearn a lot of things which I am still trying hard to do. :/

(via mewnette)

this is something that struck me so clearly when i left women’s college to go to co-ed graduate school. i remember being in my first seminar and thinking “why do these guys think they can just talk whenever they want, who cares about their opinion” and getting so many compliments from girls in my classes about how good i was at talking in class. it’s crazy to see how instilled these communication rules are in adults

(via duhdoydorothy)